Presentation: App. Sound of Design
Press Conference: February 21, 2019, 11:00 a.m.
Venue: Die Neue Sammlung – The Design Museum, Pinakothek der Moderne, München
Duration: from February 21, 2019 onwards

THE ‘SOUND OF DESIGN’ APP
The sounds of designer objects are often as characteristic as their shape. For this reason, from February 21, 2019 onwards visitors will be able to listen to the sounds of various exhibits at Die Neue Sammlung using our new “Sound of Design” Web app. The spectrum of sounds ranges from the ringing of old telephone sets to the specific engine sounds of iconic autos to the clicking of typewriter keys. Thanks to the app, the sounds are now part of the multimedia exhibition experience we offer visitors and bring the otherwise museum-bound objects back to life.
At present, the app includes 49 exhibits from the current show, and there are up to five different sounds for each. Visitors can compile their favorites in a playlist and also download all the sounds free of charge for private use. The Web app itself doesn’t need to be downloaded and can instead simply be opened in your browser at www.sound-of-design.de. To facilitate the use of the app, all the exhibition halls are equipped with BayernWLAN free of charge. There are plans to expand the selection of exhibits featured in the app – above all as regards the planned Schaudepot.

THE SOUND OF THE ‘ECONOMIC MIRACLE’
In the 1950s and 1960s, many countries in Europe and beyond experienced a rapid economic upturn. Countless new companies entered the market and fielded a vast array of new appliances in an attempt to woo consumers. Individual products such as typewriters or cameras were developed and produced in different versions for ever more precisely defined target groups. At the same time, the electricity grids became more powerful. As a consequence, alongside mechanical products innumerable electrical appliances forced their way onto the market. The devices ranged from shavers and electric whisks to portable radios and covered ever more aspects of everyday life, also introducing any number of new sounds.

THE SOUND ARCHIVE
Just how quickly certain sounds are elided from cultural memory can be seen from appliances that use a technology which becomes obsolete after only a few years owing to rapid technical progress. This is especially true of acoustic coupler modems: Their characteristic, loud dial-in sound was ubiquitous in the 1990s but was swiftly forgotten, at the latest as of the new millennium. While individual units were collected by museums, and there are presumably various examples still lying around in attics, the sound of the acoustic coupler disappeared from everyday life in the space of only a few years. And it is difficult to get the devices to produce the sounds today, as sockets and transmission technologies have changed. To counteract the loss of these memories, the archive will include the sounds not only of historical but also of current products, such as a new vacuum cleaner.

The app was made possible by the generosity of the IKEA Stiftung.

This presentation is supported by PIN. Freunde der Pinakothek der Moderne e.V..

FURTHER INFORMATION
Dr. Caroline Fuchs
Die Neue Sammlung – The Design Museum
T +49 (0) 89 272 725-0
fuchs@die-neue-sammlung.de

Tine Nehler M.A.
Head of Press Department
Pinakotheken | Pinakothek der Moderne | Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen
T +49 (0)89 23805-122
presse@pinakothek.de
www.pinakothek-der-moderne.de/presse

These images may be used free of charge for editorial reporting on this exhibition, on condition that the credit is clearly and fully indicated. Download: Move Cursor on your choice and click; start download of High Resolution files with “save as” command.

Preview of the app Sound of Design.
Development: Klangerfinder GmbH & Co KG


 

 

Dieter Rams: Tape Recorder TG 502/504, 1964, Braun AG, Kronberg/Taunus, Germany, Drawing: Carla Nagel


Sony Design Center: Walkman WM-DD II, 1984, Sony Corporation, Tokyo, Japan, Drawing: Carla Nagel


Telephone M00/OB05 of the German Imperial Post Office, from 1900, Siemens & Halske, Berlin, Germany, Drawing: Carla Nagel


 

 

Telephone M00/OB05 of the German Imperial Post Office, from 1900, Siemens & Halske, Berlin, Germany, Photo: Die Neue Sammlung – The Design Museum (A. Laurenzo)


Telephone Fg tist 264 b, 1950, Siemens & Halske AG, Berlin, Germany, Drawing: Carla Nagel


Telephone Fg tist 264 b, 1950, Siemens & Halske AG, Berlin, Germany, Photo: Die Neue Sammlung – The Design Museum (A. Laurenzo)


Calculating Machine Facit, 1950, AB Atvidabergs Industrier, Atvidaberg, Sweden, Drawing: Carla Nagel


Calculating Machine Facit, 1950, AB Atvidabergs Industrier, Atvidaberg, Sweden, Photo: Die Neue Sammlung – The Design Museum (A. Laurenzo)


Electronic Whisk HM/Q1/220/A1, Robert Bosch GmbH, Stuttgart, Germany, Drawing: Carla Nagel


Electronic Whisk HM/Q1/220/A1, Robert Bosch GmbH, Stuttgart, Germany, Photo: Die Neue Sammlung – The Design Museum (A. Laurenzo)


Jürgen Peters, Hubert Petras, Hairdryer LD 63, 1959, VEB Elektrogeräte- und Armaturenwerk Bad Blankenburg, German Democratic Republic, Drawing: Carla Nagel


Max Bill, Timer 310/1044, 1956, Gebrüder Junghans AG, Schramberg, Germany, Drawing: Carla Nagel


Arthur Braun, Fritz Eichler, Radio SK 2/2, 1959, Braun AG, Kronberg/Taunus, Deutschland | Germany, Drawing: Carla Nagel